February 28, 2014

Mixing for Purple


Continuing on the theme of mixing primary colors, the chart above illustrates what happens when Emperor's Silk and Napoleonic Blue are combined together. A range of strong purple hues is the result.
At this time, Annie Sloan Chalk Paint does not offer a dark purple (or bright pink), pre-mixed, so knowing how to mix your own is the only way to add it to your color palette.

I used the same process that was used for the red-yellow color options, a 1/2 cup measurement  for equal parts. The middle column shows what happens when Pure White is added to each result. These are similar to the purples that are available pre-mixed from Chalk Paint.




If you are trying to match exactly any of the Chalk Paint colors, you may be disappointed. Annie Sloan's formulas for paint colors are more complex than merely mixing 2  of them. But, if you want to add a range of purples to your palette, this is an easy and inexpensive way to do it.

Here are some ideas found on Pinerest to use custom mixed purples.










Mixing standard colors in different amounts and combinations is a great way to create a diverse and unique color palette. To see some the custom colors you can make from Annie Sloan Chalk Paint®, see my posts, Mixing for Green,  and Mixing for Orange.




February 26, 2014

Mix Your Own Annie Sloan Colors


This is a follow-up on yesterday's post. Although not an exact match,
a little mixing of Emperor's Silk + English Yellow + Pure White,
will result in adding 4 more colors to your Chalk Paint supplies. In addition,
white + single color, allows you to make these tints:




Tomorrow,  Emperor's Silk + Napoleonic Blue

February 25, 2014

Color Studies


  I have been working on some color studies with Annie Sloan Chalk Paint to show how to extend the range of colors. The first ones are focused on what I would consider are her "primary colors"; red, yellow, and blue or Emperor's Silk, English Yellow, and Napoleonic Blue. Adding Pure White to these three colors of paint results in an amazing number of colors, shades and tints.

I used actual paints, measured carefully, and recorded my results.  The resulting paint samples were scanned into my computer for accurate color representation. Keep in mind, however,  that your computer may display these colors differently.

This first chart shows the results of mixing Emperor's Silk with English Yellow.  Once I had these samples I  added various amounts of Pure White. A "part" can be any amount you choose, as long as you are consistant - tablespoons, cups, ounces. I used a 1/2 cup measurement. Its also a good idea to keep a swatch  anytime you mix paints and note the formula you used. I keep a notebook because I find I easily misplace separate pieces of paper. I also make a note of the colors I use on pieces I paint.

The color cards below may help if the chart is at all confusing. In my next post I will be adding Napoleonic Blue to Emperor's Silk, and English Yellow.  I'd love to know if you have any questions and if you find this helpful in any way. Thanks so much for all your comments and feedback.


  


Mixing standard colors in different amounts and combinations is a great way to create a diverse and unique color palette. To see some the custom colors you can make from Annie Sloan Chalk Paint®, see my posts, Mixing for Green, and Mixing for Purple

February 24, 2014

The Blues


In order to create a vintage finish similar to the one on this little chest,
start with a coat of Annie Sloan Chalk Paint in Duck Egg Blue.
Once that is dry, using a light touch, add some areas of Louis Blue
and Old White to give depth to your finish. Finally, add Coco
 with a dry brush to create shadows. Use a clear wax on the entire piece
 when finished painting. The wax helps protect the paint, 
but also contributes to the look of an aged patina, like that seen
 on antiques and vintage furniture.



For more Blues, see my posts,  Duck Egg and Louis Blue,  Out of the Closet, and  Porte a Saint Emilion.

February 21, 2014

A Pink That Is Not Shy

 
 A bright pink can be made by mixing colors of 
Annie Sloan Chalk Paint: Emperor's Silk and Pure White.
Color + White = Tint

Bright Colors

A door in Portugal is more than just Yellow and Orange.
Patches of red, green, and purple are part of its history.
Annie Sloan Chalk Paint layered the colors above
 will yield a similar look. 

February 20, 2014

The Look of Verdigris

There are many techniques and products to create the look
of Verdigris. This is one of my favorites because it is easy, works on any surface
and is long lasting, even on outdoor furnishings. Annie Sloan Chalk Paint, in this order:
One coat of each, leaving spots where other colors show through.

1. Graphite
*2. Primer Red 
3. Duck Egg Blue
4. Provence

 Can be topcoated with polyurethane (Do not use wax for anything left outdoors).

*Primer Red: Optional. Use to give look of rust.


For a different verdigris on an outdoor light see my post Patina and Verdigris,

At the Harbor

A door in a fishing village echos the colors of the sea.

Portal in Arles

A door located in Arles, France, shows the
Annie Sloan Chalk Paint color named in its honor.
A Duck Egg Blue is layered on top. 

February 19, 2014

Perfect Panels

These built in shelves and cabinets have a rich depth and deep coloration that
can be duplicated with Annie Sloan Chalk Paint. The key is to not use just
one color. Rather, layer the colors to bring out the subtle shades and highlights.
This creates a surface that almost looks like a velvet or suede fabric 
and highlights the detail in the woodwork.

February 18, 2014

Veranda Style

                                   

Beautiful paneling is obtainable with Annie Sloan Chalk Paint. Although
the prominent overall color is green, notice the additional colors. Old Violet,
Paris Grey, and French Linen can be mixed and layered to create the aged
appearance of the walls, console table, and chair.

French Blues




A charming stack of vintage French Bistro Chairs
display years of paint.

Combining and layering different hues can make your blue complex and interesting. For more blue inspiration, see my posts, Chinese Apothecary Cabinet, Modern Chalk Paint, and  Rococo Commode



February 17, 2014

Green with Envy


Annie Sloan Chalk Paint is easily mixed to form
custom colors. Antibes Green added to Florence results
in a deep emerald. Tints can then be made by adding
different amounts of Old White to the custom color.


Blanket Chest


To recreate the look of this beautiful blanket chest, 
layer these colors of Annie Sloan Chalk Paint. Wax and gently
distress for an aged patina. 

February 16, 2014

Update - Walnut Cabinet



An old Walnut Jelly Cabinet is given an update with Annie Sloan Chalk Paint.
First, a coat of Paris Grey, then a mix of French Linen and Old White. 
Clear Wax, and Dark Wax in the crevices. Top was left natural, 
and inside painted with Old White. It now holds towels and linens in the master bath.

February 14, 2014

February 12, 2014

Annie Sloan Chalk Paint Color Wheel






































Annie Sloan Chalk Paint Color Wheel.  Color + Old White = Tints. Different amounts of Old White (or Pure White) combined with a color will yield a progression. This is helpful in extending your range of colors no matter what type of paint you are using.



Each color was hand painted and scanned into my computer for color accuracy. However, colors displayed on computer screens are likely to be different from one computer, ipad, iphone to the next. The only way to ensure color accuracy is to view a hand painted  sample in person, in different lighting situations. Something I have learned the hard way, with a lot of  practice and mistakes.


Mixing standard colors in different amounts and combinations is a great way to create a diverse and unique color palette. To see some the custom colors you can make from Annie Sloan Chalk Paint®, see my posts, Mixing for Green, Mixing for Purple, and Mixing for Orange.

February 11, 2014

What? Another Paint Chart?

Many people think Annie Sloan Chalk Paint is too expensive, but I actually believe it is a great value.  It is so highly pigmented, that a little goes a long way. Other than artists paints, the ones that come in those 2 ounce tubes, I have never found a paint of this quality.  That said, if you paint furniture on a regular basis and want a wide range of colors, smart buying is the key.  It is important to have a few basic colors. Pure White, Old White, or Graphite added to a blue, red, green, or yellow will give you a wide range of shades. 


Buying the most staurated color of a group, will give you the most flexibility. Its easy to lighten a dark color. Even if you love green, buying all of the greens will limit your ability to create different looks. This chart is meant to organize by color group, and saturation,  to expand your range and maximize your budget.

I’d love your feedback on this. Is this something you do?  Or do you find her colors so subtle  it is too hard to mix them. Do you have a few favorite colors you use most of the time?

Mixing standard colors in different amounts and combinations is a great way to create a diverse and unique color palette. To see some the custom colors you can make from Annie Sloan Chalk Paint®, see my posts, Mixing for Green, Mixing for Purple, and Mixing for Orange.

February 10, 2014

Cool and Collected

Cool Colors on a Collected Chair



Antibes Green is one of the most popular Chalk Paint Colors. For more ideas to use Antibes Green, see these posts you may have missed .  Old Table, New Look,  Custom Purple and Lime Green, and   Stack of Bowls


February 9, 2014

Color Tints


Red into Pink

Annie Sloan's Chalk Paint, Emperor's Silk,
 can be mixed with Pure White, to form deep to pale pinks.
Layering over Graphite adds depth and texture.

February 6, 2014